{FD} Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Immigrants Do Not Increase Crime, Research Shows

12 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5191
12 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4917

Gendrome Editors’ Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

A group of criminologists show the claim of a link is false — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

{FD} Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Mitch Landrieu Is Not Running From Race

24 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5191
24 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4917

Gendrome Editors’ Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Speaking with The Atlantic’s editor-in-chief Jeffrey Goldberg at the Citylab Detroit conference this week, former New Orleans mayor Mitch Landrieu broke down his perspective on why the Civil War was fought.“Well, the first thing it was fought for was to destroy the country,” said Landrieu. “I think we can agree that had the Confederacy won, the United States as we knew it, would have been fractured. So it was against the United States. The second reason is it was done to preserve slavery.”The discussion was about how to develop a national dialogue on race and diversity, particularly during an era when the president is fanning the flames of racial tension and promoting white nationalism. Earlier this year, Landrieu released his book In the Shadow of Statues: A White Southerner Confronts History. The title is an allusion to his work while mayor to take down four monuments in New Orleans that represented paeans to Confederate and white supremacist causes. On the day they came down, Landrieu, as mayor, gave a passionate speech on race, in which he said:   This is, however, about showing the whole world that we as a city and as a people, are able to acknowledge, understand, reconcile, and most importantly, choose a better future for ourselves, making straight what has been crooked and making right what was wrong. Otherwise, we will continue to pay a price with discord, with division and yes, with violence.One could say that this is exactly what has happened since he made the speech. Just days before Landrieu’s talk in Detroit, a white terrorist Robert Bowers opened fire in a Jewish synagogue in Pittsburgh, killing 11 people and injuring several others. Bowers’ attack was motivated by his hostility towards this Jewish community’s participation in a refugee settlement program, which brings people from impoverished and war-torn countries such as Afghanistan, Haiti, and Somalia to the U.S.  ”This is the way autocracies start.” @MitchLandrieu talks about the Southern strategy of separating people by race—and its visible legacy today. #CityLabDetroit pic.twitter.com/uIshjya2LN — AtlanticLIVE (@AtlanticLIVE) October 30, 2018CityLab spoke with Landrieu at the conference about his thoughts on the Pittsburgh synagogue killings, how to lead a sanctuary city in times of racial violence, the long history of black people fighting to bring down Confederate monuments, and, of course, whether he is running for president.First, do you have any thoughts you’d like to share with the city of Pittsburgh about the tragic killings that just took place there?Personally, to the Pittsburgh community and all of the families, I know that they know that the nation grieves with them because the individuals that were lost were friends and family members. On top of that, it was the most aggressive attack against Jewish citizens that the country has ever seen.  It’s laid on top of the shootings in Kentucky [Editor’s Note: A white man killed two African Americans in a grocery store in Jeffersontown, Kentucky, over the weekend.] People forget about Tamir Rice. People forget about what happened in Charleston when nine African-American lives were taken at Emanuel A.M.E. church. It’s all the same iteration of the poison of hate.It fuels the immigration debate. It fueled the Confederate monuments debate. It’s all the same thing, and unfortunately it’s not just in the United States of America. You see a worldwide trend that is giving air to this notion of white supremacy and hating people based on race, creed, color, sexual orientation, and it’s something that needs to be identified, called out, and confronted. It is sad, but it can be beaten back if you call it out for what it is.How should cities that are aspiring to have “sanctuary” or “welcoming” status respond in the wake of this violence? Should they dial such efforts back or keep pushing forward?Well, first of all, it’s really hard because when you have people that want to use weapons to hurt other people, it’s very hard to stop them in that act. What you can do though as a community is have an ethos that diversity is a strength. It’s not a weakness. That everybody is welcome irrespective of race, creed or color, sexual orientation, nation of origin, etc. The other side really tries to get a leg up by creating the impression that somehow that means that you are for violence and crime. No, every mayor in America and every citizen wants to live in a safe place and wants to make sure that people who commit crimes and hurt other people on a day-to-day basis are [punished]. I would just say to them, you should treat them based on their behavior but not of their race, creed or their color.The president continues to make the wrong point, that people who are Muslims are prone to be terrorists; that people who are Mexican are prone to be rapists; that people who African Americans are prone to be criminals. That’s just not the world that we live in. We’re not supposed to aspirationally think that way in America, so you have to create those conditions on the ground. And you do that by being inclusive, not exclusive. The president is the exact opposite of what you should be. And his language is the exact opposite of the language we should use. Now I want everybody to be careful about this. He’s not necessarily the cause, although he’s exacerbating it. He’s a much larger symptom. The country needs to start looking at itself and ask why are we susceptible to these kinds of provocations from him? The way to win is to go vote, to elect other people that think differently.Some people say that talking about racism when discussing politics is too divisive. How have you tried to keep the issue of racism central in this environment?There are many people who are admonishing those of us who want to talk about race and say, ‘Oh, don’t talk about it,’ as if not talking about it is going to cure the problem. I completely disagree with that. I think you cannot go around race. You can’t go over it, you actually have to go through it, and you have to talk about it. You have to acknowledge that it is a complicated issue for the country. You have to find a way to address it. You have to be willing to work through it on both sides of the issue. Discriminating against somebody based on race is one of the iterations of hate, like discriminating against somebody because of their religion. It is poison from the same tree. You see it roaring its head. You can’t ignore it as though it’s not happening. You’ve got to call it out and say, look, this is a problem. That’s not who we are. That’s not what we do.To the extent that for some reason we now have a president, the only one that’s ever talked like this—the way to confront that is to vote for people who don’t think like that and, to check him. He came out and made a recommendation that we end birthright citizenship as though somehow as the president, he could alter the Constitution. We don’t have a kingdom. We live in a representative democracy and the president can’t alter the Constitution. The Constitution reflects the will of the people. And so the will of the people has to make itself known, and we do that normally through elections and that’s why I want to encourage people who disagreed with his view of the world to go vote and make sure that they check him for the next couple of years.Perhaps one of the unintended consequences of actions such as taking down Confederate statues, is that people who support what the Confederacy stood for get rallied up and they vote their values and people into office.I mean as a general rule, as a general rule, whatever action is taken in  politics—any one of them benign or malintended—creates a backlash. Wherever there’s a consequence there’s a repercussion. But some of them that have to be made. For example, President Obama’s election created a backlash. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have done it. You’ve got to question why are we having a backlash to that? We’re not actually trying to hurt you. We’re trying to help you. The fact that some people see it that way—look, we’re in a democracy, you know. And the battle place of ideas is on the street. Let’s have the argument. You know, at the end of the day, the way it’s supposed to work is that the people who go to the polls and vote for their elected representatives, are supposed to elect people to represent their values. And if for some reason we made a wrong turn a couple of years ago with electing Donald Trump, which I would strongly argue that we did, and he has taken us backwards, as he promised he would do, then you have to say, oh shoot, he really meant “[Make America Great] Again,” like way back when and we don’t want to go back. We want to go forward. You got to course correct and the way you course correct is by the next election, and that’s going to be in a couple of days.In your book you talk about your decisions around bringing the Confederate monuments down in New Orleans, and there is a decades-long movement of black people working to do that.It was more than decades. It was hundreds and hundreds of people that have been trying to do that for a long, long period of time. I mean, I can remember back in the 60s, Lolis Eric Elie, and Nils Douglas, and Judy Reese Morse’s father, who was a Freedom Rider, Oretha Castle Haley—all of those people advocated for it. And then of course [former New Orleans mayors] Dutch Morial talked about it. Marc Morial talked about it. Sidney Barthelemy. They all tried. Our team was really just standing on the shoulders of huge numbers of people that helped make that happen. We found ourselves in an interesting political moment where it became possible. But I think about Avery Alexander, who was one of my great friends and one of my heroes, who got pulled down the steps of city hall. He tried to take those monuments down, too. So there was a decades-long struggle almost from the time they went up.Grassroots organizations such as TakeEmDownNOLA who’ve been fighting for this say that you haven’t given them credit for their efforts.I’ve credited them every time I talk about it. I thank them and everybody else who had anything to do with it. They were an important part of a much larger whole, and I’ve done that. I say it in the book, actually in the end of the book. I credit everybody and I think I named them as well. So you know, sometimes people can’t take yes for an answer, but I feel they did their part along with a whole bunch of other people.Are you running for president? Not at this time.  

{FD} Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Bones and Stones: Cemetery Geology

12 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5191
12 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4917

Gendrome Editors’ Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

A tour of Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, NY, focuses on the geology of the landscape and the mausoleums. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

{FD} Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Spinal Stimulator Implant Gives Paralytic Patients a Chance to Regain Movement

12 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5191
12 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4917

Gendrome Editors’ Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

A new therapy that amplifies nerve impulses may also help the body heal — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

{FD} Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: CityLab Daily: When Trick-or-Treat Is Against the Law

24 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5191
24 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4917

Gendrome Editors’ Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Keep up with the most pressing, interesting, and important city stories of the day. Sign up for the CityLab Daily newsletter here.***What We’re FollowingSpirit of the law: Old local laws can appear to grow cobwebs; they go unenforced over the years and are eventually forgotten. Case in point: weird Halloween ordinances. In some towns, decades-old laws declare it illegal to trick-or-treat above a certain age (sorry, teens) or after certain hours. The rules can be strangely specific, too—who really wants to ban masks on Halloween?Aside from spooking some stringent rule-followers, why do these laws stay on the books when police have other ways to address Halloween mischief? CityLab’s Claire Tran and Nicole Javorsky take a look at why these mysteriously selective regulations haunt  modern municipalities, and why some advocates say it’s time to repeal them and let kids be kids. Read: The Towns Where Trick-or-Treaters May Run Afoul of the Law.For more #SpookyLab, look for a special Halloween edition of our Navigator newsletter in your inbox this afternoon (and subscribe here if you haven’t already!)—Andrew SmallMore on CityLabI Survived Brooklyn’s ‘L Train Shutdown Nightmare’ Bushwick residents: Tremble before the ghastly horror of mild commuting inconvenience!Lucas RiccardiCalifornia Ballot Measures Address Affordable Housing and Homelessness State and city ballot measures are offering a variety of strategies for improving access to affordable housing and shrinking the homeless population.Sarah Holder200 Years of Elections to the House of Representatives, Mapped This deliciously wonky interactive map is a reminder for midterm voters that, when it comes to electoral politics, “deviation from the norm is the norm.”Tanvi MisraThe Talent Dividend in Urban and Rural Areas Urban places have the largest numbers of college graduates, but rural counties are starting to see more growth.Richard FloridaSome Neighborhoods Are Becoming ‘Candy Deserts’ on Halloween Instead of going door-to-door, many parents are taking their kids elsewhere to get candy.Julie BeckTunnel Vision Construction in a Washington metro tunnel. (WMATA)Washington, D.C., has all kinds of tunnels, from the many miles carved out by Metro to the underground labyrinth that connects the government buildings on Capitol Hill. A new D.C. Underground Atlas maps them all out in detail, offering a novel lens to look at the city’s underground infrastructure. It also provides an alternative cultural history of Washington, as all these systems have to intertwine with the federal government’s large footprint. “Nowhere else do you have to schedule building around moon landings,” says the amateur cartographer behind the project. Today on CityLab: Mapping the Many Tunnels Under Washington, D.C.What We’re ReadingWhen citizen engagement becomes too much (Governing)California gives Waymo first permit to test self-driving cars without humans (Quartz)The rise of stadium seating (Curbed)In the Rust Belt, women candidates hope to disprove the “macho” narrative of 2016 (Vox)Tell your friends about the CityLab Daily! Forward this newsletter to someone who loves cities and encourage them to subscribe. Send your own comments, feedback, and tips to hello@citylab.com.

{FD} Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Appendix identified as a potential starting point for Parkinson’s disease

12 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5191
12 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4917

Gendrome Editors’ Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Removing the appendix early in life reduces the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease by 19 to 25 percent, according to the largest and most comprehensive study of its kind. The findings solidify the role of the gut and immune system in the genesis of the disease, and reveal that the appendix acts as a major reservoir for abnormally folded alpha-synuclein proteins, which are closely linked to Parkinson’s onset and progression.

{FD} Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Astronomers discover the giant that shaped the early days of our Milky Way

12 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5191
12 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4917

Gendrome Editors’ Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Some ten billion years ago, the Milky Way merged with a large galaxy. The stars from this partner, named Gaia-Enceladus, make up most of the Milky Way’s halo and also shaped its thick disk, giving it its inflated form.

{FD} Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Autism-Friendly Apartments Open in Phoenix

11 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5190
11 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4916

Gendrome Editors’ Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Lindsey Eaton, 24, is from the Phoenix area and works for the Arizona School Boards Association. She has autism, which, she said, she doesn’t see as a diagnosis: “I see it as awesomeness.”Eaton describes herself as very independent, “but I still need help with some things like laundry, budgeting, and getting to work.” She used to live with her parents despite wanting to live on her own.In July, Eaton moved into one of the country’s first apartment complexes for adults with autism and neurodiversities. She now has her own one-bedroom unit in the Phoenix complex, which is called First Place. “It’s been a little eye-opening, because for years in a row, I had check-ins every minute—my parents saying, ‘How are you doing? What can I do? Do you need help cleaning?’” she explained. Now, she often has to figure things out for herself. “It’s taught me patience, and to do things and not rely on people.”The exterior of the building includes design features to prevent sensory overload among residents who are hypersensitive to certain stimuli. (Scott Sandler)First Place may be among the first of its kind, but the need for places like it is clear. Up to half a million teens with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) will reach adulthood in the next decade, following a rise in diagnoses over the past 30 years. One study found that the vast majority of adults with ASD between the ages of 19 and 30 continue to live with their parents, an arrangement that becomes challenging as parents age. Many autistic adults face long waits for state-sponsored group housing and a lack of other options.Denise Resnik started thinking about this more than 20 years ago, after her son, Matt, was diagnosed with autism. “We were told to love, accept, and plan to institutionalize him,” she said. She visited a number of facilities and was disheartened by the conditions and quality of care: “I thought there has to be another way.” Resnik is the founder and executive director of the nonprofit that runs First Place and shares its name. In the 1990s, she co-founded the Southwest Autism Research & Resource Center (SARRC), which began to research housing options for people with autism and partnered with other organizations to come up with guidelines. Years later, First Place is the result.It’s a three-pronged operation. First, there’s the nonprofit-run, 55-unit apartment building, where people with ASD can live near-independently, but with 24/7 support. It has a fitness center, a pool, and a culinary teaching kitchen. Then there’s the on-site Transition Academy, which runs a two-year program to teach residents life and work skills. (While many residents are expected to go on living at First Place after completing the program, for others, Resnik said, “it might be the first place after leaving their family but [then] they may go elsewhere”). Finally, there’s a leadership institute aimed at producing research, policies, and training related to ASD.Funding has come from a mix of sources, Resnik said: philanthropy, a private loan, and the federal New Markets Tax Credit program, which incentivizes investment in low-income communities. First Place did not use Department of Housing and Urban Development funds, since HUD limits the disabled population of properties it supports to 25 percent (to avoid an institutionalizing effect), a policy that Resnick says is overly prescriptive and not data-based.An apartment interior. First Place tries to honor residents’ desire for independence while offering in-house support. (©2017 Rick D’Elia/D’Elia Photographic)Rent at First Place, which includes a basic suite of care services, is not cheap. It starts at $3,300 per resident in a furnished two-bedroom apartment, or $3,600 for a one-bedroom. Resnik hopes a competitive market will evolve over time, and points to what has happened with senior housing. “Today, you recognize how that market has emerged, at different locations, price points, with different kinds of services and amenities for people with mobility and health issues,” she said. “We just want options.”The design of the complex, by RSP Architects, is tailored to people with ASD and neurodiversities. A main goal was to prevent sensory overload, so the building has no harsh overhead lights such as fluorescents, and gypsum concrete was used between the floors to muffle ambient noise. RSP previously designed the first high school built for autistic students, at the Minnesota Autism Center in Eagan.Mike Duffy, a senior associate at RSP, said a major difference between First Place and other projects of its size is the amount of space dedicated to common use. He added that one of the biggest challenges was trying to balance sensitive design elements with promoting independent living skills. “We [were] always walking a fine line between creating a place that was catered to those individuals on the spectrum, while at the same time, wanting to create a place that will reflect some of what they are likely to encounter in a typical apartment,” he said.First Place is in a central location in Phoenix, within walking distance of public transit and close to jobs, cultural facilities, stores and restaurants, and healthcare. That access to support networks and services was considered crucial. So far, more than 30 people have moved in, including 37-year-old Michael Goodrich. He arrived at First Place in July after other living situations didn’t work out.“Right away, [the staff] had this meeting, where they imagined a day in the life of Michael,” said his sister Lynn Balter, who helped him find First Place. “They value his opinions and made him feel like he matters.”

{FD} Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: For Halloween Consider the Chocolate Midge

11 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5190
11 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4916

Gendrome Editors’ Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

A tiny fly, related to biting no-see-ums, pollinates cacao trees and enables our chocolate cravings. Christopher Intagliata reports.  — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

{FD} Database Proof Substratum: Substratum of Proof LGBTQs Are Mentally Ill: Machines that learn language more like kids do

11 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Castrations of Boys: 5190
11 mins ago: Total LGBTQ Genital Mutilations of Girls: 4916

Gendrome Editors’ Note: The article below provides the raw material for a proof and is not the proof itself. In addition, the raw material may contain one or more false statements and/or some offensive, outside content.

Researchers describe a parser that learns through observation to more closely mimic a child’s language-acquisition process, which could greatly extend the parser’s capabilities.